IT professionals in a range of occupations are eligible to be nominated for a skilled visa to Australia. These include Business and Systems Analysts, Programmers, Database and Systems Administrators, ICT Security Specialists, and ICT Network and Support Professionals. ICT support roles such as sales professionals, support technicians, managers and trainers can also be nominated.

As part of our series which looks at the Australian visa options available to selected occupations, here we consider IT occupations. We identify occupations that are eligible to be nominated for a skilled visa, how each is classified and defined in Australia for migration purposes and the potential skilled visa options that may be available.

We also recommend that you refer to our first article in this series, where we outline the potential skilled visa options that may be available to prospective applicants who have the required skills for the IT occupations as discussed. There you will also find links to more detailed information about each skilled visa subclass, including English language requirements that apply to skilled visas, and some key points that prospective applicants should be aware of when embarking on this process.

A skills assessment may also be required as part of eligibility requirements for a skilled visa. The prescribed skills assessing body for most IT professionals is the Australian Computer Society (ACS), although for certain occupations, a different body is specified.

Some ICT support technician occupations and Radiocommunications Technicians are assessed by Trades Recognition Australia (TRA), and the prescribed skill assessing body for Telecommunications Engineering professional occupations, as well as for some Telecommunications technical specialists is The Institution of Engineers Australia (Engineers Australia).

For IT Sales professionals, Vocational Education and Training Assessment Services (VETASSESS) conducts skills assessments for migration purposes.

As we discuss each of the selected IT occupations in this article, we also identify the prescribed skill assessing body for each, and provide further information about the ACS requirements later in this article.

Which IT occupations are eligible for a skilled visa in Australia?

All occupations in Australia are classified by Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) and this is also used for migration purposes. For each occupation, ANZSCO provides a general description, skill level, registration and/or licensing requirements as well as tasks and duties.

ANZSCO categories for IT occupations (classified as minor groups) are set out below:

  • ICT managers (minor group 135);
  • Human resource and training professionals (minor group 223);
  • Sales, marketing and public relations professionals (minor group 225);
  • Business and Systems Analysts, and Programmers (minor group 261);
  • Database and Systems Administrators, and ICT Security Specialists (minor group 262);
  • ICT Network and Support Professionals (minor group 263); and
  • ICT and telecommunications technicians (minor group 313).

Each of the above minor groups contain unit groups of occupations. These are then further divided into specific occupations, which are each assigned an ANZSCO code. This code is used as an identification tool in the relevant Skilled Occupation List (SOL) which applies to each skilled visa, if the ANZSCO code is included in the SOL, then it can be nominated as a skilled occupation.

In the below discussion, we examine the minor groups listed above, and then look further at the unit groups that make up each minor group. To conclude, we consider the most important aspect, being the specific occupations, which may be nominated for a skilled visa to Australia.

Minor Group 135 – ICT Managers

We start our analysis with ANZSCO minor group 135 for ICT Managers.

ANZSCO General Description: ICT Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the acquisition, development, maintenance and use of computer and telecommunication systems within organisations.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this minor group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • analysing information needs and specifying technology to meet those needs
  • formulating and directing information and communication technology (ICT) strategies, policies and plans
  • directing the selection and installation of ICT resources and the provision of user training
  • directing ICT operations and setting priorities between system developments, maintenance and operations
  • overseeing the security of ICT systems

The 135 minor group consists of a single unit group, as set out below.

UNIT GROUP 1351 – ICT MANAGERS

There are three occupations included in the ICT Managers ANZSCO unit group, which share the following elements:

ANZSCO General Description: ICT Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the acquisition, development, maintenance and use of computer and telecommunication systems within organisations.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • analysing information needs and specifying technology to meet those needs
  • formulating and directing information and communication technology (ICT) strategies, policies and plans
  • directing the selection and installation of ICT resources and the provision of user training
  • directing ICT operations and setting priorities between system developments, maintenance and operations
  • overseeing the security of ICT systems

Skill assessing authority: ACS

A description of each occupation in the ICT Managers ANZSCO unit group is listed below. Note that the SOL and skilled visa options are not the same for these occupations.

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

Skilled Occupation List

Skilled Visa options

Chief Information Officer

Alternative Title:

Chief Technology Officer

135111

Plans, organises, directs, controls and coordinates the ICT strategies, plans and operations of an organisation to ensure the ICT infrastructure supports the organisation’s overall operations and priorities.

Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL)

Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) subclass 186 visa

Training subclass 407 visa

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Medium Term Stream)

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa*

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

ICT Project Manager

135112

Plans, organises, directs, controls and coordinates quality accredited ICT projects. Accountable for day-to-day operations of resourcing, scheduling, prioritisation and task coordination, and meeting project milestones, objectives and deliverables within agreed timeframes and budgets.

Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Training subclass 407 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)**

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa*

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

ICT Managers nec***

135199

This occupation group covers ICT Managers not elsewhere classified.

Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Training subclass 407 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)**

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa*

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)


*Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

**Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

***Occupations in this group include:

  • IT Service Delivery Manager
  • Network Manager

Minor Group 223 – Human resource and training professionals

Now we examine ANZSCO minor group 223 for Human resource and training professionals.

ANZSCO General Description: Human resource and training professionals plan, develop, implement and evaluate staff recruitment, retention, training and development programs, assist in resolving disputes by advising on workplace relations policies and problems, and represent industrial, commercial, union, employer and other parties in negotiations.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this minor group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • arranging for advertising of job vacancies, interviewing and testing of applicants, and selection of staff
  • providing advice and information to management on human resource policies and procedures, staff performance and misconduct matters
  • undertaking negotiations on terms and conditions of employment, and examining and resolving disputes and grievances
  • studying and interpreting legislation, awards and agreements, wage payment systems, and dispute settlement procedures
  • developing, planning and formulating workplace relations policies and programs, and procedures for their implementation
  • identifying and determining the need for training, through identifying competencies and defining training requirements in the work environment
  • designing, developing and assessing staff training and development

The ANZSCO minor group 223 for Human resource and training professionals includes one relevant unit group for IT occupations, namely, 2232 ICT Trainers.

UNIT GROUP 2232 – ICT TRAINERS

This unit group consists of the single occupation of ICT Trainer, with the following elements:

ANZSCO code: 223211

Alternative Title: ICT Educator

ANZSCO General Description: ICT trainers analyse and evaluate information-based system training needs and objectives, and develop, schedule and conduct ICT-based system training programs and courses.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • identifying technical training needs and requirements of individuals and organisations
  • setting human resource development objectives and evaluating learning outcomes
  • preparing and developing instructional training material and aids such as handbooks, visual aids, online tutorials, demonstration models, and supporting training reference documentation
  • designing, coordinating, scheduling and conducting ICT training and development programs that can be delivered in the form of individual and group instruction, and facilitating workshops, meetings, demonstrations and conferences
  • liaising with external training providers to arrange delivery of specific training and development programs
  • promoting internal and external training and development, and evaluating these promotional activities
  • monitoring and performing ongoing evaluation and assessment of training quality and effectiveness, and reviewing and modifying training objectives, methods and course deliverables
  • gathering, investigating and researching background materials to gain a full understanding of the ICT subject matter and systems
  • keeping up-to-date with new product version releases, advances in programming languages, application development software, and general information technology trends
  • writing end user products and materials such as user training, tutorial and instruction manuals, online help, and operating and maintenance instructions

Skill assessing authority: ACS

Skilled Occupation List: Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled Visa options:

  • Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**
  • Training subclass 407 visa
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)
  • Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa
  • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

ANZSCO Minor Group 225 – Sales, marketing and public relations professionals

The ANZSCO minor group 225 for Sales, marketing and public relations professionals are characterised by the following elements.

ANZSCO General Description: Sales, marketing and public relations professionals plan, develop, coordinate and implement programs of information dissemination to promote organisations, goods and services, and represent companies in selling a range of technical, industrial, medical, pharmaceutical and ICT goods and services.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this minor group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • commissioning and undertaking market research, analysing the findings, and planning advertising, marketing and public relations activities
  • supporting business growth and development through the preparation and execution of marketing objectives, policies and programs
  • planning and organising publicity campaigns
  • appraising and selecting material submitted by writers, Photographers, Illustrators and others to create favourable publicity
  • acquiring and updating knowledge of employers’ and competitors’ goods and services, and market conditions
  • assessing customers’ needs and explaining and demonstrating goods and services to them
  • visiting regular and prospective client businesses to establish and act on marketing opportunities
  • quoting and negotiating prices and credit terms, and completing contracts

The 225 minor group contains the unit group 2252 for ICT Sales Professionals.

UNIT GROUP 2252 – ICT SALES PROFESSIONALS

The ICT Sales professionals unit group includes three occupations with the following common elements.

ANZSCO General Description: ICT Sales professionals manage client accounts and represent companies in selling a range of computer hardware, software and other ICT goods and services to industrial, business, professional and other organisations.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • compiling lists of prospective client businesses using trade directories and other sources
  • acquiring and updating knowledge of employer’s and competitors’ goods and services, and market conditions
  • visiting regular and prospective client businesses to establish and act on selling opportunities
  • assessing customers’ needs and explaining the goods and services which meet their needs
  • promoting employers’ ICT goods and services to existing and prospective clients
  • quoting and negotiating prices and credit terms, and completing contracts and recording orders
  • arranging delivery of goods, installation of equipment and the provision of services
  • reporting to sales management on sales made and the marketability of ICT goods and services
  • following up with clients to ensure satisfaction with ICT goods and services purchased, arranging modifications and resolving any problems arising
  • preparing sales reports, and maintaining and submitting records of business expenses incurred

Skill assessing authority: VETASSESS

Skilled Occupation List: Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled Visa options:

  • Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**
  • Training subclass 407 visa
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)
  • Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa
  • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

ICT Account Manager

225211

Manages sale of computer hardware, software and services to existing account clients and identifies further sales opportunities within these accounts, builds new account clients, manages customer satisfaction and retention, and coordinates the preparation and presentation of ICT sales proposals and tenders.

ICT Business Development Manager

225212

Identifies and generates new ICT business opportunities to further improve market share and awareness by gaining an understanding of customers’ ICT needs and promoting goods and services to these customers. May manage some key customer accounts.

ICT Sales Representative

225213

Develops and converts sales opportunities into sales of computer hardware, software and ICT services.

ANZSCO Minor Group 261 – Business and systems analysts, and programmers

Next, we look at ANZSCO minor group 261 for Business and systems analysts, and programmers.

ANZSCO General Description: Business and systems analysts, and programmers work with users to formulate system requirements, develop system plans and documentation, review and evaluate existing systems, and design and modify systems to meet users’ business needs, create audiovisual applications, and develop, test and maintain code for computer applications and websites.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this minor group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • identifying, formulating and documenting user ICT requirements
  • providing advice, guidance, expertise and assistance in the system project decision making process and in the development of system proposals and strategies
  • identifying and evaluating inefficiencies, deficiencies and limitations in existing systems and associated processes, procedures and methods, and recommending optimal business practices, and system functionality and behaviour
  • testing, debugging, diagnosing and correcting problems to ensure acceptable quality and integrity of the system, and that programs and applications perform to specification
  • designing and developing digital animations, imaging, presentations, games, video clips, and Internet applications using multimedia software, tools and utilities, interactive graphics and programming language

The 261 minor group comprises the following unit groups:

  • Unit Group 2611 ICT Business and Systems Analysts
  • Unit Group 2612 Multimedia Specialists and Web Developers
  • Unit Group 2613 Software and Applications Programmers

Next, we discuss the specific IT occupations that may be nominated in each of the above unit groups.

UNIT GROUP 2611 – ICT BUSINESS AND SYSTEMS ANALYSTS

There are two occupations included in the ICT Business and systems analysts ANZSCO unit group, which share the following elements:

ANZSCO General Description: ICT Business and systems analysts work with users to formulate system requirements, develop system plans and documentation, review and evaluate existing systems, and design and modify systems to meet users’ business needs.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • working with users to formulate and document business requirements
  • identifying, investigating, and analysing business processes, procedures and work practices
  • identifying and evaluating inefficiencies and recommending optimal business practices, and system functionality and behaviour
  • using project management methodologies, principles and techniques to develop project plans and to cost, resource and manage projects
  • taking responsibility for deploying functional solutions, such as creating, adopting and implementing system test plans, which ensure acceptable quality and integrity of the system
  • creating user and training documentation, and conducting formal training classes
  • developing functional specifications for use by system developers
  • using data and process modelling techniques to create clear system specifications for the design and development of system software
  • acting as a central reference and information source, providing guidance and assistance in the system project decision making process

Skilled Occupation List: Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL)

Skilled Visa options:

  • Skilled (Independent) subclass 189 visa
  • Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (Family Sponsored)*
  • Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) subclass 186 visa
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**
  • Training subclass 407 visa
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Medium Term Stream)
  • Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa
  • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)
  • Temporary Graduate subclass 485 visa (Graduate Work Stream)***

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

*** Potential applicants may also qualify under the Post-Study Work Stream, which does not apply a Skilled Occupation List

A description of the occupations in this ANZSCO unit group is listed below.

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

ICT Business Analyst

Alternative Titles:

BA (ICT)

Business Consultant (ICT)

261111

Identifies and communicates with users to formulate and produce a requirements specification to create system and software solutions.

Systems Analyst

261112

Evaluates processes and methods used in existing ICT systems, proposes modifications, additional system components or new systems to meet user needs as expressed in specifications and other documentation.

ANZSCO Minor Group 262 – Database and systems administrators, and ICT security specialists

The ANZSCO minor group 262 for Database and systems administrators, and ICT security specialists is characterised by the following elements.

ANZSCO General Description: Database and systems administrators, and ICT security specialists plan, develop, maintain, manage and administer organisations’ database management systems, operating systems and security policies and procedures to ensure optimal database and system integrity, security, backup, reliability and performance.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this minor group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • designing and maintaining database architecture, data structures, tables, dictionaries and naming conventions to ensure the accuracy and completeness of all data master files
  • performing the operational establishment and preventive maintenance of backups, recovery procedures, and enforcing security and integrity controls
  • implementing and administering database documentation, guidelines, policies and procedures
  • testing database systems and upgrades, such as debugging, tracking, reproduction, logging and resolving all identified problems, according to approved quality testing scripts, procedures and processes
  • accepting responsibility for the processes, procedures and operational management associated with system security and disaster recovery planning
  • liaising with security vendors, suppliers, service providers and external resources; analysing, recommending, installing and maintaining software security applications; and monitoring contractual obligations, performance delivery and service level agreements
  • troubleshooting and providing service support in diagnosing, resolving and repairing server-related hardware and software malfunctions, encompassing workstations and communication infrastructure
  • preparing and maintaining documentation, policies and instructions, and recording and detailing operational procedures and system logs
  • ensuring that the design of computer sites allows all components to fit together and work properly, and monitoring and adjusting the performance of networks
  • continually surveying the current computer site to determine future network needs and making recommendations for enhancements in the implementation of future servers and networks

The 262 minor group consists of a single unit group, as set out below.

UNIT GROUP 2621 – DATABASE AND SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATORS, AND ICT SECURITY SPECIALISTS

There are three occupations included in the database and systems administrators, and ICT security specialists ANZSCO unit group, which share the following elements:

ANZSCO General Description: Database and systems administrators, and ICT security specialists plan, develop, maintain, manage and administer organisations’ database management systems, operating systems and security policies and procedures to ensure optimal database and system integrity, security, backup, reliability and performance.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • designing and maintaining database architecture, data structures, tables, dictionaries and naming conventions to ensure the accuracy and completeness of all data master files
  • performing the operational establishment and preventive maintenance of backups, recovery procedures, and enforcing security and integrity controls
  • implementing and administering database documentation, guidelines, policies and procedures
  • testing database systems and upgrades, such as debugging, tracking, reproduction, logging and resolving all identified problems, according to approved quality testing scripts, procedures and processes
  • accepting responsibility for the processes, procedures and operational management associated with system security and disaster recovery planning
  • liaising with security vendors, suppliers, service providers and external resources; analysing, recommending, installing and maintaining software security applications; and monitoring contractual obligations, performance delivery and service level agreements
  • troubleshooting and providing service support in diagnosing, resolving and repairing server-related hardware and software malfunctions, encompassing workstations and communication infrastructure
  • preparing and maintaining documentation, policies and instructions, and recording and detailing operational procedures and system logs
  • ensuring that the design of computer sites allows all components to fit together and work properly, and monitoring and adjusting the performance of networks
  • continually surveying the current computer site to determine future network needs and making recommendations for enhancements in the implementation of future servers and networks

Skill assessing authority: ACS

A description of each occupation in the database and systems administrators, and ICT security specialists ANZSCO unit group is listed below. Note that the SOL and skilled visa options are not the same for these occupations.

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

Skilled Occupation List

Skilled Visa options

Database Administrator

Alternative Titles:

Database Operator,

Database Specialist,

Database Support,

DBA

262111

Plans, develops, configures, maintains and supports an organisation’s database management system in accordance with user requirements ensuring optimal database integrity, security, backup, reliability and performance.

Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**

Training subclass 407 visa

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

ICT Security Specialist

Alternative Title:

Security Administrator

262112

Establishes, manages and administers an organisation’s ICT security policy and procedures to ensure preventive and recovery strategies are in place, and minimise the risk of internal and external security threats.

Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL)

Skilled (Independent) subclass 189 visa

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (Family Sponsored)*

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*

Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) subclass 186 visa

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**

Training subclass 407 visa

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Medium Term Stream)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

Temporary Graduate subclass 485 visa (Graduate Work Stream)***

Systems Administrator

Alternative Title:

Systems Manager

262113

Plans, develops, installs, troubleshoots, maintains and supports an operating system and associated server hardware, software and databases ensuring optimum system integrity, security, backup and performance.

Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**

Training subclass 407 visa

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

ANZSCO Minor Group 263 – ICT Network and support professionals

Next is ANZSCO minor group 263 for ICT Network and support professionals.

ANZSCO General Description: ICT network and support professionals research, analyse, plan, design, install, monitor and maintain ICT systems to support the business needs of organisations and individuals.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this minor group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • planning, designing, developing, configuring and commissioning networks and systems
  • analysing, evaluating and monitoring network infrastructure to ensure networks are configured to operate at optimal performance
  • troubleshooting and diagnosing network and system problems, and determining the most appropriate means of resolving problems and issues to improve system performance
  • monitoring the overall performance of systems to assess the need for updates, upgrades, enhancements, preventive maintenance and new systems, and recommending options for upgrading and improving the performance of systems
  • scheduling and conducting quality audit inspections

The ANZSCO minor group 263 comprises the following unit groups:

  •   2631 Computer Network Professionals
  •   2632 ICT Support and Test Engineers
  •   2633 Telecommunications Engineering Professionals

Now we’ll look at the specific professional occupations that may be nominated in the above unit groups.

UNIT GROUP 2631 – COMPUTER NETWORK PROFESSIONALS

There are three occupations included in the computer network professionals ANZSCO unit group, with the following common elements:

ANZSCO General Description: Computer network professionals research, analyse and recommend strategies for network architecture and development, implement, manage, maintain and configure network hardware and software, and monitor and optimise performance, and troubleshoot and provide user support.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • analysing, developing, interpreting and evaluating complex system design and architecture specifications, data models and diagrams in the development, configuration and integration of computer systems
  • researching, analysing, evaluating and monitoring network infrastructure to ensure networks are configured to operate at optimal performance
  • assessing and recommending improvements to network operations and integrated hardware, software, communications and operating systems
  • providing specialist skills in supporting and troubleshooting network problems and emergencies
  • installing, configuring, testing, maintaining and administering new and upgraded networks, software database applications, servers and workstations
  • providing network programming in support of specific business needs and requirements
  • preparing and maintaining procedures and documentation for network inventory, and recording diagnosis and resolution of network faults, enhancements and modifications to networks, and maintenance instructions
  • monitoring network traffic, and activity, capacity and usage to ensure continued integrity and optimal network performance

Skill assessing authority: ACS

A description of each occupation in the computer network professionals ANZSCO unit group is listed below. Note that the SOL and skilled visa options are not the same for these occupations.

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

Skilled Occupation List

Skilled Visa options

Computer Network and Systems Engineer

263111

Plans, develops, deploys, tests and optimises network and system services, taking responsibility for configuration management and overall operational readiness of network systems, especially environments with multiple operating systems and configurations, and provides troubleshooting and fault-finding services for network problems.

Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL)

Skilled (Independent) subclass 189 visa

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (Family Sponsored)*

Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) subclass 186 visa

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**

Training subclass 407 visa

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Medium Term Stream)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

Temporary Graduate subclass 485 visa (Graduate Work Stream)***

Network Administrator

Alternative Titles:

Network Specialist,

Network Support

263112

Installs and maintains hardware and software, documents diagnosis and resolution of faults, manages user passwords, security and inventory documentation, ensures the efficient performance of servers, printers and personal computers, and attends to other operational tasks. May also perform tasks such as help desk support and user training.

Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**

Training subclass 407 visa

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS)

subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

Network Analyst

Alternative Titles:

Network Designer,

Network Strategist

263113

Researches and analyses network architecture, and recommends policies and strategies for designing, planning and coordinating an organisation’s network such as the total system environment and architecture. May also perform operational tasks such as monitoring system performance, software and hardware upgrades, backups, support and network maintenance.

Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa

Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*

Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**

Training subclass 407 visa

Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)

Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa

Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

*** Potential applicants may also qualify under the Post-Study Work Stream, which does not apply a Skilled Occupation List

UNIT GROUP 2632 – ICT SUPPORT AND TEST ENGINEERS

There are four occupations included in the ICT Support and test engineers ANZSCO unit group, with the following common elements:

ANZSCO General Description: ICT Support and test engineers develop procedures and strategies to support, create, maintain and manage technical quality assurance processes and guidelines and systems infrastructure, investigate, analyse and resolve system problems and performance issues, and test the behaviour, functionality and integrity of systems.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • scheduling and conducting quality audit inspections, and analysing and reviewing systems, data and documentation
  • identifying variations and potential high risk areas in securing adherence to standards and procedures
  • recommending corrective action plans and improvements in the resolution of non-compliance with standards detected through monitoring and auditing of processes and procedures
  • communicating, educating and liaising with users and management to ensure awareness and adherence to standards, procedures and quality control issues and activities
  • assisting in troubleshooting, diagnosing, testing and resolving system problems and issues
  • developing, conducting and providing technical guidance and training in application software and operational procedures
  • analysing, evaluating and diagnosing technical problems and issues such as installation, maintenance, repair, upgrade and configuration and troubleshooting of desktops, software, hardware, printers, Internet, email, databases, operating systems and security systems
  • testing, identifying and diagnosing functionality errors and faults in systems, and programming code within established testing protocols, guidelines and quality standards to ensure systems perform to specification
  • performing organisational systems architecture reviews and assessments, and recommending current and future hardware and software strategies and directions
  • creating and reviewing technical documentation such as procedural, instructional and operational guides and manuals, technical reports and specifications and maintenance inventory systems

Skill assessing authority: ACS

Skilled Occupation List: Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled Visa options:

  • Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**
  • Training subclass 407 visa
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)
  • Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa
  • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

A description of the occupations in the ICT Support and test engineers ANZSCO unit group are listed below.

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

ICT Quality Assurance Engineer

Alternative Titles:

Quality Analyst (ICT)

Quality Manager (ICT)

Quality Specialist (ICT)

263211

Creates, maintains and manages technical quality assurance processes and procedures to assess efficiency, validity, value and functional performance of computer systems and environments, and audits systems to ensure compliance with, and adherence to, accredited internal and external industry quality standards and regulations. May supervise the work of ICT quality assurance teams.

ICT Support Engineer

Alternative Titles:

Support Analyst

Support Architect

263212

Develops support procedures and strategies for systems, networks, operating systems and applications development, solves problems and provides technical expertise and direction in support of system infrastructure and process improvements, and diagnoses and resolves complex system problems.

ICT Systems Test Engineer

Alternative Titles:

Systems Tester

Test Analyst (ICT)

263213

Specifies, develops and writes test plans and test scripts, produces test cases, carries out regression testing, and uses automated test software applications to test the behaviour, functionality and integrity of systems, and documents the results of tests in defect reports and related documentation.

ICT Support and Test Engineers nec*

263299

This occupation group covers ICT Support and Test Engineers not elsewhere classified.

* Occupations in this group include:

  • Usability Architect

UNIT GROUP 2633 – TELECOMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

There are two occupations included in the telecommunications engineering professionals ANZSCO unit group, with the following common elements:

ANZSCO General Description: Telecommunications engineering professionals design, construct, install, service and support telecommunications equipment, systems and facilities.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. At least five years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualification. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).

Tasks include:

  • planning, designing, building, configuring and commissioning telecommunications devices, networks and systems, such as voice, radio, two-way, data, microwave, satellite and digital data systems, and ensuring telecommunications systems interconnect with equipment from different manufacturers, service providers and users
  • compiling engineering project proposals to define goals, identify scope, background and need, and ascertain cost of equipment, parts and services
  • evaluating and procuring new products and services from vendors
  • ensuring compliance with laws, regulations, policies and procedures in the provision of telecommunications systems
  • selecting and developing new telecommunications sites by locating sites, filing documents, drawing up documents for approval, drafting construction drawings and following through to approval
  • determining appropriate configurations of telecommunications hardware and software, ensuring desired performance of telecommunications equipment
  • preparing and interpreting specifications, drawings and regulations for the use of telecommunications equipment
  • determining the type and arrangement of circuits, transformers, circuit-breakers, transmission lines and equipment
  • identifying and analysing problems and needs of existing telecommunications systems, such as interference, intelligibility and clarity, to determine the most appropriate means of reducing, eliminating and avoiding current and future problems and improve communications
  • monitoring telecommunications systems to assess need for updates, upgrades, enhancements, preventive maintenance and new systems
  • assessing performance levels of system hardware and software to project future needs, and developing short- and long-terms plans for updating equipment, adding capabilities, enhancing existing systems and providing improved telecommunications

Skill assessing authority: Engineers Australia

Skilled Occupation List: Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL)

Skilled Visa options:

  • Skilled (Independent) subclass 189 visa
  • Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (Family Sponsored)*
  • Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) subclass 186 visa
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**
  • Training subclass 407 visa
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Medium Term Stream)
  • Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa
  • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)
  • Temporary Graduate subclass 485 visa (Graduate Work Stream)***

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

*** Potential applicants may also qualify under the Post-Study Work Stream, which does not apply a Skilled Occupation List

ANZSCO Minor Group 313 – ICT and telecommunications technicians

We now turn to the ANZSCO minor group 313 for ICT and telecommunications technicians.

ANZSCO General Description: ICT and telecommunications technicians provide support to the development and maintenance of computer infrastructure, web technology and telecommunications networks, and the diagnosis and resolution of technical problems.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this minor group have a level of skill commensurate with an AQF Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma (ANZSCO Skill Level 2)

At least three years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualifications listed above. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification.

Tasks include:

  • determining software and hardware requirements to provide solutions for problems
  • responding to inquiries about software and hardware problems
  • repairing and replacing peripheral equipment such as terminals, printers and modems
  • installing and downloading appropriate software, and adapting existing programs to meet users’ requirements
  • implementing computer networks, and ensuring efficient use of applications and equipment
  • designing and maintaining websites
  • installing and maintaining microwave, telemetry, multiplexing, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic wave communication systems
  • configuring and integrating network and telecommunications technology with computer software, hardware, peripherals and operating systems
  • planning the development of customer access telecommunications network infrastructure

The ANZSCO minor group 313 comprises the following unit groups:

  • 3131 ICT Support Technicians
  • 3132 Telecommunications Technical Specialists

Next, we look at the specific IT occupations that may be nominated in each of the above unit groups.

UNIT GROUP 3131 – ICT SUPPORT TECHNICIANS

There are four occupations included in the ICT Support technicians ANZSCO unit group, which share the following elements:

ANZSCO General Description: ICT Support technicians provide support for the deployment and maintenance of computer infrastructure and web technology and the diagnosis and resolution of technical problems.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with an AQF Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma (ANZSCO Skill Level 2).

At least three years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualifications listed above. In some instances, relevant experience may be required in addition to the formal qualification.

Tasks include:

  • determining software and hardware requirements to provide solutions to problems
  • responding to inquiries about software and hardware problems
  • adapting existing programs to meet users’ requirements
  • installing and downloading appropriate software
  • ensuring efficient use of applications and equipment
  • implementing computer networks
  • designing and maintaining websites
  • repairing and replacing peripheral equipment such as terminals, printers and modems
  • may work in a call centre

Skill assessing authority: TRA for all occupations in this unit group, with the exception of Web Administrator (ANZSCO 313113), for which the prescribed skill assessing body is ACS.

A description of each occupation in the ICT Support technicians ANZSCO unit group is listed below. Note that the SOL and skilled visa options are not the same for these occupations.

Skilled Occupation List: Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)

Skilled Visa options:

  • Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**
  • Training subclass 407 visa
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Short Term Stream)
  • Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa
  • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

A description of each occupation in the ICT Support technicians ANZSCO unit group is listed below.

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

Hardware Technician

313111

Supports and maintains computer systems and peripherals by installing, configuring, testing, troubleshooting, and repairing hardware.

ICT Customer Support Officer

Alternative Titles:

ICT Help Desk Officer

ICT Help Desk Technician

Systems Support Officer

313112

Provides support, education and guidance in the deployment and maintenance of computer infrastructure and the diagnosis and resolution of technical problems and issues. May work in a call centre.

Web Administrator

Alternative Title:

Web Master

313113

Designs, builds and maintains websites, and provides web technology solutions and services.

ICT Support Technicians nec*

313199

This occupation group covers ICT Support Technicians not elsewhere classified.


* Occupations in this group include:

  • Applications Packager
  • Computer Systems Technician
  • Telecommunications Computer Systems Technician

UNIT GROUP 3132 – TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNICAL SPECIALISTS

There are four occupations included in the Telecommunications technical specialists ANZSCO unit group, which share the following elements:

ANZSCO General Description: Telecommunications technical specialists develop, monitor and carry out technical support functions for telecommunications networks and install computer equipment, computer systems and microwave, telemetry, multiplexing, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic wave communication systems.

ANZSCO Skill level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with an AQF Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma (ANZSCO Skill Level 2).

At least three years of relevant experience and/or relevant vendor certification may substitute for the formal qualifications listed above. In some instances, relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification.

Tasks:

  • installing, maintaining, repairing and diagnosing malfunctions of microwave, telemetry, multiplexing, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic wave communication systems
  • configuring and integrating network and telecommunications technology with computer software, hardware, desktops, peripherals, databases and operating systems
  • developing and recording logs of the details, locations and status of inventories, parts, equipment and instruments and maintaining the documentation of communication policies, procedures, guidelines and regulations, and quality standards
  • providing technical advice and information, and monitoring the performance of complex telecommunications networks and equipment
  • planning the development of customer access telecommunications network infrastructure
  • liaising with vendors, suppliers, service providers and external resources and monitoring contractual obligations and performance delivery
  • providing ongoing operational support in designing, optimising, troubleshooting, diagnosing, repairing and resolving of telecommunications network performance malfunctions, defects and faults

Skill assessing authority: Engineers Australia for all occupations in this unit group, with the exception of Radiocommunications Technician (ANZSCO 313211), for which the prescribed skill assessing body is TRA.

A description of each occupation in the Telecommunications technical specialists ANZSCO unit group is listed below.

Skilled Occupation List: Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL)

Skilled Visa options:

  • Skilled (Independent) subclass 189 visa
  • Skilled (State Sponsored) subclass 190 visa
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (State or Territory Nominated)*
  • Skilled (Regional) subclass 489 visa (Family Sponsored)*
  • Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) subclass 186 visa
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) subclass 187 visa**
  • Training subclass 407 visa
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa (Medium Term Stream)
  • Skilled Work Regional (provisional) subclass 491 visa
  • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) subclass 494 (Employer sponsored stream)
  • Temporary Graduate subclass 485 visa (Graduate Work Stream)***

*Only available to eligible applicants under the Second Provisional Visa stream of the Subclass 489 visa.

**Only available to eligible Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) and Subclass 457 Temporary Work (Skilled) visa holders under the Temporary Residence Transition Stream (TRTS).

*** Potential applicants may also qualify under the Post-Study Work Stream, which does not apply a Skilled Occupation List

A description of each occupation in the Telecommunications technical specialists ANZSCO unit group is listed below.

ANZSCO Occupation

ANZSCO code

ANZSCO Description

Radiocommunications Technician

313211

Installs, maintains, repairs and diagnoses malfunctions of microwave, telemetry, multiplexing, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic wave communication systems.

Telecommunications Field Engineer

313212

Plans, designs, commissions and monitors complex telecommunications networks and associated equipment, provides technical advice and information, and identifies complex problems and initiates action to resolve them.

Telecommunications Network Planner

313213

Plans the development of customer access telecommunications network infrastructure.

Telecommunications Technical Officer or Technologist

313214

Carries out specialised design and support functions in telecommunications engineering including optimisation and performance monitoring of telecommunications networks, diagnosis and repair of faults, and the selection and installation of equipment.

Skill Assessments for IT Occupations

As noted in our introduction, the prescribed skills assessing body for most IT occupations is the Australian Computer Society (ACS). For the remainder of our discussion, we provide further details about the skill assessment process and requirements for ACS skills assessments, with links to further detailed information on how to apply.

For more information about the other skill assessing bodies, please contact us.

You may also like to refer to the following guides:

The ACS has the following four assessment pathways:

  • Temporary Graduate (TG)
  • Post Australian Study (PAS)
  • Skills Assessment (Skills)
  • Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

The Skills pathway noted above, which is a general skills assessment application to assess tertiary ICT qualifications and ICT employment, is the relevant application required for migration purposes.

Set out below are the requirements you will need to meet for a suitable migration skills assessment:

Option 1: Qualification comparable to AQF Bachelor Degree or Higher with an ICT Major

  • If your degree is assessed as having an ICT major and is closely related to your nominated occupation, you will require 2 years relevant work experience completed within the past 10 years or 4 years relevant work experience completed anytime in your past work history (whichever provides the earliest skill date) to meet the suitability criteria.
  • If your degree is assessed as having an ICT major and is NOT closely related to your nominated occupation, you will require 4 years relevant work experience completed anytime in your past work history to meet the suitability criteria.

Option 2: Qualification comparable to AQF Bachelor Degree or Higher with an ICT Minor

  • If your degree is assessed as having an ICT minor and is closely related to your nominated occupation, you will require 5 years relevant work experience completed in the past 10 years or 6 years relevant work experience completed anytime in your past work history (whichever provides the earliest skill date) to meet the suitability criteria.
  • If your degree is assessed as having an ICT minor and is NOT closely related to your nominated occupation, you will require 6 years relevant work experience completed anytime in your past work history to meet the suitability criteria.

Option 3: Qualification comparable to AQF Diploma or Vendor Certification

  • If your AQF qualification or Vendor Certification is assessed as having an ICT Major and is closely related to your nominated occupation, you will require 5 years relevant work experience completed within the past 10 years or 6 years relevant work experience completed anytime in your past work history (whichever provides the earliest skill date) to meet the suitability criteria.
  • If your AQF qualification or Vendor Certification is assessed as having an ICT Major and is NOT closely related to your nominated occupation, you will require 6 years relevant work experience completed anytime in your past work history to meet the suitability criteria.

For all of the above, relevant ICT work experience must be professional ICT employment and at least 20 hrs per week. Some further important points to note are:

  • If your work experience is completed before the completion date of your qualification, the Skill Level Requirement Met Date will be determined on the earliest date that both the relevant work experience and the qualifications are completed;
  • The past 10 years requirement period for work experience is determined by the 10 years that precede the submission date of your online skills application;
  • The term “Relevant work experience” means work experience which is closely related to the nominated occupation (ANZSCO) and performed at a professional ICT level; and
  • The ICT Major and Minor assessment is based on the number of units with sufficient ICT content and the number of ICT units that are closely related to the nominated occupation.

The above information has been adapted from the Australian Computer Society, Migration Skills Assessment Guidelines, December 2019 information guide. We recommend that you refer to this document, which contains detailed information on the ACS skills assessment process and requirements.

The ACS has also produced a Summary of Criteria, which is a quick reference guide of assessment requirements.

The ACS Application Checklist, which contains a list of required documents, and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), a quick reference guide to common assessment questions, are also useful documents to refer to.

The ACS application is required to be lodged online as decision ready, which means you must submit all required documentation at time of submission of your application. ACS is not required to request further documents from you, and any missing or incorrect information/documentation will delay the processing of your application, and may result in an unsuitable outcome.

Australia’s migrations laws are complex, and each case is different. There are also several terms which are defined in the migration provisions (and whose meanings may differ from their ordinary usage). We recommend that you seek professional advice if you are seeking to apply for a skilled visa to Australia, as being fully informed about the process and requirements that apply will give you the best chance of achieving a successful outcome on your application, and thus lessen the chance that it will be refused. A migration professional can help you to do this.

For up to date advice on the Australian visa options for IT occupations, book your confidential consultation with a migration agent in Adelaide. PAX Migration Australia is a leading immigration advice service based in Adelaide.

 

References/Links:

The Institution of Engineers Australia (Engineers Australia)

https://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/

Vocational Education and Training Assessment Services (VETASSESS)

https://www.vetassess.com.au/

Australian Computing Society (ACS)

https://www.acs.org.au/

Trades Recognition Australia (TRA)

https://www.tradesrecognitionaustralia.gov.au/

Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO)

https://www.abs.gov.au/ANZSCO

Minor Group 135 – ICT Managers

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/8FCD4F6974287C4ECA257B9600207ACE?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 1351 – ICT MANAGERS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/7F69EDFAC48B7D3DCA257B960020A809?opendocument

Minor Group 223 – Human resource and training professionals

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/23FC0C38167AB38ECA257B95001310A1?opendocument

ANZSCO Unit Group 2232 – ICT Trainers

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/2E25CB55C8C05BABCA257B95001310F9?opendocument

ANZSCO Minor Group 225 – Sales, marketing and public relations professionals

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/32ADBFC35F4E6CACCA257B9500131033?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 2252 – ICT SALES PROFESSIONALS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/AFC1AFF46EBFBF92CA257B95001310B6?opendocument

ANZSCO Minor Group 261 – Business and systems analysts, and programmers

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/BFB6F05D806A8AC5CA257B9500131115?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 2611 – ICT BUSINESS AND SYSTEMS ANALYSTS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/0DD934711C851E03CA257B950013116B?opendocument

ANZSCO Minor Group 262 – Database and systems administrators, and ICT security specialists

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/F8ED7B68FA0C0DF2CA257B95001310E8?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 2621 – DATABASE AND SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATORS, AND ICT SECURITY SPECIALISTS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/980B817E74A5280ACA257B95001310E9?opendocument

ANZSCO Minor Group 263 – ICT Network and support professionals

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/1ED0FA66C898973ACA257B9500131095?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 2631 – COMPUTER NETWORK PROFESSIONALS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/8EF5499204A2FBECCA257B9500131105?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 2632 – ICT SUPPORT AND TEST ENGINEERS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/910AD59EA0503603CA257B9500131096?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 2633 – TELECOMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/569570B1AE0A46E5CA257B950013114E?opendocument

ANZSCO Minor Group 313 – ICT and telecommunications technicians

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/58C899F4CE97D232CA257B9500131164?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 3131 – ICT SUPPORT TECHNICIANS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/66DC1F45C5F2AA7ACA257B9500131168?opendocument

UNIT GROUP 3132 – TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNICAL SPECIALISTS

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/Product+Lookup/55C714FCBE173BF2CA257B9500131165?opendocument

ACS – Migration Skills Assessment – Information for Applicants

https://www.acs.org.au/msa/information-for-applicants.html

ACS – Skills Assessment Information – Summary of Criteria – A quick reference of assessment requirements

http://www.acs.org.au/msa/summary-of-criteria.html

ACS – Skills Assessment Information – Skills Assessment Guidelines for Applicants – Detailed information on our skills assessment process and requirements

http://www.acs.org.au/msa/skills-assessment-guidelines-for-applicants.html

ACS – Skills Assessment Information – ACS Application Checklist – List of required documents

https://www.acs.org.au/content/dam/acs/acs-skills/Application-Checklist.pdf

ACS – Skills Assessment Information – Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) – A quick reference guide to common assessment questions

https://www.acs.org.au/msa/skills-faqs.html